James Montemagno
James Montemagno

Live, Love, Bike, and Code.

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James Montemagno

Development

Building VSTS/TFS Tasks with TypeScript and VS Code

Over the last few years I have fallen in love with VSTS for handling all of my application and backend continuous integration, deployment, and release management. Each of these services offer a task based build and release definition that enable you to easily start automating anything. There are a ton of built in tasks, and a whole marketplace where you can install them into your VSTS/TFS project. At some point though, you may need to do something custom that isn't a task that has been built. Do…

James MontemagnoJames Montemagno

Data Caching Made Simple with Monkey Cache 🐒 for .NET

Let's be honest, every application needs to store data. Sometimes it is settings, configuration, HTTP requests, or a full database. What I was recently looking to accomplish was to make a web request, cache the request locally, and have it expire after a given amount of time. There are a lot of great solutions out there for storing data, but nothing seemed to fit exactly what I was looking for with a minimal amount of dependencies. So I figured I would tweet about it: What library should I use f…

James MontemagnoJames Montemagno

So we started a podcast... Merge Conflict

Two full years in the making with the amazing Frank Krueger, it finally happened, we started a podcast. I am not sure why or how it took two full years, but the time seemed just right to bring everyone a weekly show. Aptly named Merge Conflict, the podcast will be delivered right to your podcast listening device every single Monday at 7AM GMT, where we will be chatting on development, technology, and whatever else Frank and I are up to. We spent a lot of time… two years… thinking…

James MontemagnoJames Montemagno

App releases and what happens to those developers

Development cycles are extremely interesting, you have an idea and a core problem that you are out to solve. Early on in development you will study other apps, core user interface designs, and really map out your application. After this it is time to code and get serious. The following months you set a core foundation that you will build the apps off of, core user interface principles you want to implement, and of course start knocking features off one at a time. Fast forward a few months, you…

James MontemagnoJames Montemagno

I crush code and share it, publish NuGet packages, speak at conferences, upload videos, pretend I am good at playing video games, micro blog, tweet up a storm, drink gallons of coffee, and ride my bike. Checkout my monthly newsletter that you should subscribe to!